WEN Researchers

Meet the growing team of specialists involved in Research and/or Conservation efforts focused on horses, asses, zebra, and the ecosystems on which they depend.

Without the commitment and passion of extraordinary people, the Wild Equus Organization projects would not succeed. We are grateful to their essential and relentless commitment to the study, protection, conservation and management of free-living equids the world over.

Meet the Wild Equus Network of Researchers!
Jose Luis Canelon

Organization:

Catedra Caballo Criollo Venezolano.

Emeritus Professor. Universidad Centroccidental Lisandro Alvarado

Projects:

Research and characterization of the Venezuelan Creole Horse (VCH). The VCH is a breed in fact, so we are trying its recognition as a first Venezuelan Horse Breed.

Comments:

I joined the WEN to be in touch with other persons who work with wild horses

Karen DalkeKaren Dalke

Organization:

University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

Projects:

Karen is currently a Senior Lecturer of anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay in Green Bay, Wisconsin USA. The primary focus of my research has been on the mustang in the American west. Since legislation in 1971, the struggles over protecting the mustang on public lands, illuminates political, economic and environmental issues between humans and animals. I have published and presented papers on this issue in Australia, Finland, Greece, India, Netherlands and the United States.

Website: http://www.uwgb.edu/sociology/faculty/dalke.asp/

Comments:

I currently completed a case study on mustangs and domestic horses using the United States Geographical Survey (USGS) ethogram for Free-Roaming Feral Horses This study examines behaviors of Bureau of Land Management (BLM) mustangs and domestic horses. Over 26,000 behavioral images were analyzed and sorted into 15 categories. Continuous focal sampling at one-minute intervals captured behaviors for six equids over a one-month period in the summer of 2013.

Dalke, K. and Hutchison, R. (in press 2016). Thrill killing in Wisconsin. Contemporary Justice Review Vol. 2.

Dalke, K and Wels, H. (forthcoming 2016). Ethnographic research in a changing cultural landscape. In J. Nyman and N. Schuurman (Eds.), Affect, space and animals. New York: Routledge.

Dalke, K. (2014). Adopting a mustang through an anthropological lens: Exploring cultural concepts across species. Bhatter College Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies, 3, http://bcjms.bhattercollege.ac.in/adopting-a-mustang/

Dalke, K. (2012). Minding Equines. International Society For Environmental Ethics Newsletter Vol. 23 (3), 35.

Dalke, K. (2012). Review of the book Spanish mustangs in the great American west: Return of the horse, by J.S. Hockensmith. Great Plains Research (Vol. 22, p. 207). Hanover, PA: The Sheridan Press.

Craig Downer

Organization:

Andean Tapir Fund

Projects:

Wildlife Ecologist, specialized in wild Perissodactyl including endangered Mountain/Andean Tapir and wild horses of western North America. Author of scientific and popular publications on the above as well as cocreator of films. Member IUCN SSC Tapir Specialist Group. Interested in joining Wild Equid Specialist Group as well. Activist for wild horses and burros especially in western North America but in other regions as well. Author of book The Wild Horse Conspiracy

Website: http://andeantapirfund.com
Website2: https://thewildhorseconspiracy.org

Telané Greyling

Organization:

Namibia Wild Horses Foundation

Projects:

Namibia population Demographics and behaviour

Website: http://www.wild-horses-namibia.com/

Comments:

WEN would be an ideal platform for scientists and the public to share information and be a voice and support structure for any specific population that needs protection at some stage, therefore contributing to conservation of wild and feral equids worldwide.

Sarah King

Organization:

Colorado State University

IUCN Equid Specialist Group

Projects:

Previous work on the behavioral ecology of Przewalski’s horses. Currently I am collaborating with USGS to research the demography, behavior and ecology of feral horses and burros in the American west. I am also the Coordinator of the Equid Red List Authority for the IUCN, working with other experts to conduct IUCN Red List assessments of equid species. .

Comments:

While there are equids on every continent except Antarctica there are surprisingly few equid researchers. Studying the behavior and ecology of equids can help not just conserve and aid management of these species, but also provide knowledge that can help others.

Laura Lagos

Organization:

University of Santiago de Compostela.

Projects:

I study the ecology of the Galician wild ponies: their reproduction ecology, spatial and habitat use, demographics, and I have been specially focused on the study of ponies’ predation by wolves. I´m interested in the management of the free ranging populations of horses, their ecological role in the landscapes, the ecosystem values they provide and the function of the traditional/autoctonous breeds to conserve certain cultural landscapes.

I never get tired of learning more and more about horses. Every trip to the field is an exciting event, you always learn new stuff and have the opportunities to watch new situations.

Comments:

Sharing knowledge with other horse researchers from around the world is stimulating, and putting together ideas, projects and dreams is essential to do research and to better learn about nature. This network can be the essential platform for that.

Jason Ransom

Organization:

Colorado State University

Projects:

Please see website http://www.jiransom.com

Comments:

Equids are some of the most interesting, charismatic, and emotionally complex animals on the planet, and we owe nearly all of modern civilization to their contributions….and yet, we still don’t understand them. Many of the wild equid species are beginning to disappear forever. Domestic species are too often not provided for in ways that meet their deepest social needs. Now, more than anytime in our history, we need to take notice and act with more applied science, aggressive conservation, and compassion. An active network of people from all walks of life that care about equids is a good step forward and I’m happy to contribute however I can.

Alberto ScorolliAlberto Scorolli

Organization:

Universidad Nacional del Sur, GEKKO Study Group on Conservation and Management.

Projects:

Feral horse demography, social organization, body condition. Feral horse management in natural protected areas. Long term demography and population models. Body condition as a population management tool.

Website: http://caballoscimarrones.blogspot.com.ar/

Comments:

I think Wild Equus Network will help because there are no networks currently reviewing this important topic. In my opinion networking and information sharing are very interesting avenues for the advance of knowledge and action!!

Pieter WitPieter Wit

Organization:

Chair IUCN Commission on Ecosystem Management and Counsellor of IUCN; Member of Wild Equid Specialist Group of SSC-IUCN; Member of the Board of Hustai National Park Trust; Member of the Board of Foundation Reserves Przewalski Horse

Projects:

Reintroduction of the Przewalski Horse (Takhi); Hustai National Park, Mongolia

Website: www.treemail.nl/takh

Comments:

Even though the Reintroduction of the Takhi in the Hustai National Park is a well-published success, we have to stay alert for several reasons:

  • Politics may change in Mongolia and people that are more governed by greed than by knowledge of good ecosystem management may want to take over the park;
  • Disasters may decimate the population such as occurred in Takhin Tal
  • There are still many open questions and lessons to be learned and shared
  • Attention may shift to other issues as many people have a tendency to think that things are settled once they are declared a success, not realising that continuous attention is needed to make the success sustainable

Many, if not most, wild equids are in urgent need of protection with the Somali Wild Ass as a sad “highlight”.

Victor RosVictor Ros

Organization:

Wild Equus Organization.

Projects:

Social behaviour of Equus caballus, with a focus on equine culture.Pottoka Piornal Project. Equus Ethogram Project

Website: https://wildequus.org/

Comments:

The WEN was developed to coordinate and facilitate the efforts of like minded people, towards the common goal of studying, protecting, managing and sustainably conserving wild and free living equids around the world.

Anne-Camille SourisAnne-Camille Souris

Organization:

Association GOVIIN KHULAN.

Projects:

Since 2004, I study behavioral ecology of the Mongolian khulan (Mongolian wild donkey). In 2007, I founded a non-profit organization, the Association GOVIIN KHULAN, which aims to enhance protection of the endangered Mongolian khulan and its habitat in partnership with local protected areas’ staff and local community of the eastern part of the Gobi Desert (Mongolia). In 2007, I also joined the SSC/IUCN Equid Specialist Group.

Website: http://www.goviinkhulan.com/

Comments:

I joined the WEN because I believe that such platform is very important to share information and raise international awareness to help enhance conservation of wild Equids worldwide!

Lesley HawsonDisplaying biopic compressed for docs.jpg

Organization:

Melbourne Polytechnic

Comments:

Imagine a world where there is not a truly wild horse running somewhere? For most horse lovers this is unthinkable.The Wild Equus Network works to protect our wild horse remnant populations in this age of the anthropocene. By creating a network of scientists and enthusiasts we can work together to ensure our wild equids are there to study and preserve for the generations to come. Protecting remnant wild horse populations is also like a seed bank (see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Svalbard_Global_Seed_Vault) where the rigours of natural selection protect equine genetics from the potential human driven selection problems our domesticated horses face.

I look forward to studying our wild horse populations so that we can understand the needs of Equus. I welcome the opportunity to add my veterinary and equine behaviourist skills to this cause.!

Andrea Harvey

Organization:

Centre for Compassionate Conservation
School of Life Sciences, University of Technology Sydney

Registered Veterinary Specialist

Projects:

PhD on wild horse ecology and immunocontraception.


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